Chesapeake Apothecary Rick Simpson Oil (RSO) Education

What is Rick Simpson Oil Exactly? It is a cannabis extract that takes its name from the medical marijuana activist who created it, who claimed that he applied the RSO topically to cancer spots on his face and they were healed within days. RSO is a very potent Cannabis Concentrate and contains higher levels tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoids than most other Cannabis Concentrates (Johson 2019). RSO is very versatile, and can be ingested, applied topically, or absorbed through th veins sublingually.

Grassroots Predosed
RSO HoneySticks

Chesapeake Apothecary features Rick Simpson Oil in many forms, including half and whole gram droppers, capsules, and infused honey sticks! RSO is a thick and viscous substance, so patients utilizing RSO Droppers may find it difficult to squeeze out exact doses. Pre-dosed capsules can be purchased in-store or made easily at home.

Capsules are an efficient and tasteless way to take a premeasured dose of RSO.

RSO Caps are Easy to Make at Home!

You will Need:

Empty Glycerin Capsules

Coconut Oil (Melted)

RSO Dropper

Steps

  1. Heat your coconut oil slightly until it is completely liquid, then add your entire RSO Dropper.
  2. Pull apart glycerin capsules to prep for next step
  3. Suction your coconut oil/rso mixture back into your empty RSO dropper to easily fill empty capsules.
  4. Put the top half back onto the capsules and store in cool, dry place until use!

RSO is so versatile, it can be used to create topicals as well!

Applied Topically, RSO can be used to manage certain skin conditions. Mixing RSO with a bit of coconut or olive oil will make it much easier to spread on the skin.

Since RSO is already activated, it can be ingested raw! Try spreading the rso onto a cookie or piece of fruit or cook with it to ingest! Since RSO is already activated, infusing is simple. Just melt your butter or oil and squeeze the RSO Dropper into the mixture and bake as normal!

References:

Resource Material and Research by Mia McCaslin

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325612